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Lyndon Baines Johnson

1963-1969

  • Born August 27, 1908 near Johnson City, TX
  • Died Jan. 22, 1973, of a heart attack at the Johnson Texas ranch where he was buried after lying in state in Washington, D.C.
  • He married Claudia
  • “Lady Bird” Taylor Johnson
  • They had two children
  • He attended Southwest Texas State University
  • He was in the Military, a Teacher & US Senator
  • A Democrat — vice-president, Hubert H. Humphrey
  • He brought a lot of political experience with him to the White House when he became president after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. He was secretary to Representative R. S. Kleberg 1932 to 1935, then appointed Texas state director of the National Youth Administration by President Franklin Roosevelt. He was first elected to Congress in 1937.
  • He enlisted in the US Navy Dec. 10, 1941, commissioned a lieutenant commander, awarded the Silver Star before returning to the House in mid 1942, after a ruling that national legislators couldn’t serve in the armed forces.
  • He sought the Democratic presidential nomination but lost to Kennedy, who chose him as his running mate. He was an active vice-president, serving as chairman of the Committee on Government Contracts and heading the National Aeronautics and Space Council and the president’s Committee on Equal Employment Opportunities.
  • He won the presidency in his own right in 1964 with 61$ of the vote and immediately started pushing his Great Society programs that included aid to education, attack on disease, Medicare, urban renewal, beautification, conservation, development of depressed regions and a fight against poverty.
  • Vietnam became a thorn in his side. When his efforts to end the war failed, he decided not to seek re-election. He did not live to see peace in Vietnam.

Compiled by Phyllis Stowers, Lifestyles Editor for the Lincoln Journal.

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